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Re: Cross Country navigation advice is poor

PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2020 12:53 pm
by davidg666
Kurumakun wrote:
YanisKyr wrote:2. A few years ago, Waze evaluated users' feedback and added a preference to non-cross-border routes so that's why the first option you got was ~5h - from my testing the first option to Moville is ~5h via Sligo/Longford. Waze users statistically check the route options more than Google maps users, so cross-border routes usually sit in option 2/3 (if not both 2 and 3).

I don't get this at all - why would people want to avoid crossing the border in this day and age? Driving from Cavan town to Clones on the main road involves crossing the border multiple times for example, but there's no benefit to avoiding this road. There's like 200 road border crossings, and I'm sure avoiding those is going to lead to a lot of dumb routing.

From Waze's point of view, a border crossing is a border crossing, and in many parts of the world, that means long queues at customs and passport checks and lots of other inconvenience for users. They have no way of knowing that the ROI<->IE border is as transparent as it is.

++David

Re: Cross Country navigation advice is poor

PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2020 12:15 pm
by Kurumakun
YanisKyr wrote:2. A few years ago, Waze evaluated users' feedback and added a preference to non-cross-border routes so that's why the first option you got was ~5h - from my testing the first option to Moville is ~5h via Sligo/Longford. Waze users statistically check the route options more than Google maps users, so cross-border routes usually sit in option 2/3 (if not both 2 and 3).


I don't get this at all - why would people want to avoid crossing the border in this day and age? Driving from Cavan town to Clones on the main road involves crossing the border multiple times for example, but there's no benefit to avoiding this road. There's like 200 road border crossings, and I'm sure avoiding those is going to lead to a lot of dumb routing.

Cross Country navigation advice is poor

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:34 pm
by scanlanavia
Recently on a journey from Dublin to Moville in Donegal, Waze & Google recmmmended to use the ferry from Magilligan to Greencastle.... Great.. but that services closed for the Winter !!

On the return trip from Donegal to Dublin, Waze suggested route would have taken 5 hours by avoiding northern ireland ????

Google correctly chose optimised route for a 3.5 hour journey...

Doesnt make sense to me that Google acquired Waze but Waze route recommender is poor

Re: Cross Country navigation advice is poor

PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2020 2:34 pm
by YanisKyr
Hi there, this forum is only monitored by volunteer editors so I'll focus on what we can improve.
FYI, you can also submit Map Problems via the app while you are experiencing an issue. These reports are anonymous and usually give us some useful more info e.g. small trail of the suggested route and another trail for the route you followed.

1. Thanks for bringing the seasonality of the Magilligan to Greencastle ferry to our attention. They (https://loughfoyleferry.com/timetable-fares/) haven't published a when the service will resume in 2020 so I'm adding a restriction on the ferry segments until the end of April, and will keep an eye on it.

2. A few years ago, Waze evaluated users' feedback and added a preference to non-cross-border routes so that's why the first option you got was ~5h - from my testing the first option to Moville is ~5h via Sligo/Longford. Waze users statistically check the route options more than Google maps users, so cross-border routes usually sit in option 2/3 (if not both 2 and 3).

3. Waze and Google Maps are different products, and we can explain or help users understand some of the product differences as I did above, so don't hesitate to reach out any time. Keep in mind that Google Maps is a very wide product (driving, walking, cycling, public transport, reviews, suggestions, location history, etc), while Waze is focused solely on driving.

Re: Cross Country navigation advice is poor

PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2020 6:04 pm
by YanisKyr
To correct myself when saying preference to non-cross-border routes, what in-fact happens at the routing server side is that a cross-border has a penalty.

It would be helpful if we could define hard/soft borders though, maybe a question to ask our community coordinator. I imagine what we are seeing in this example will be very common in mainland Europe where there are thousands of kilometers of "soft borders".